Benign Humor

piqued-geek:

nickelode0n:

sorry but a relationship where you forbid each other to talk to the opposite sex isn’t a relationship at all. love is about admiration not possession, we might live in a world where materialism is acceptable but people aren’t the same you can’t control someone like that

*sends this to all the couples at my school*

kk-maker:

2spoopy5you:

lohelim:

winterthirst:

sabacc:

Steve Rogers did, in fact, realize that something was off when he saw the outline of the woman’s odd bra (a push-up bra, he would later learn), but being an officer and a gentleman, he said that it was the game that gave the future away.

 (via)

No, see, this scene is just amazing. The costume department deserves so many kudos for this, it’s unreal, especially given the fact that they pulled off Peggy pretty much flawlessly.

1) Her hair is completely wrong for the 40’s. No professional/working woman  would have her hair loose like that. Since they’re trying to pass this off as a military hospital, Steve would know that she would at least have her hair carefully pulled back, if maybe not in the elaborate coiffures that would have been popular.

2) Her tie? Too wide, too long. That’s a man’s tie, not a woman’s. They did, however, get the knot correct as far as I can see - that looks like a Windsor.

3) That. Bra. There is so much clashing between that bra and what Steve would expect (remember, he worked with a bunch of women for a long time) that it has to be intentional. She’s wearing a foam cup, which would have been unheard of back then. It’s also an exceptionally old or ill-fitting bra - why else can you see the tops of the cups? No woman would have been caught dead with misbehaving lingerie like that back then, and the soft satin cups of 40’s lingerie made it nearly impossible anyway. Her breasts are also sitting at a much lower angle than would be acceptable in the 40’s.

Look at his eyes. He knows by the time he gets to her hair that something is very, very wrong.

so what you are saying is S.H.E.I.L.D. has a super shitty costume division….

Nope, Nick Fury totally did this on purpose.

There’s no knowing what kind of condition Steve’s in, or what kind of person he really is, after decades of nostalgia blur the reality and the long years in the ice (after a plane crash and a shitload of radiation) do their work. (Pre-crash Steve is in lots of files, I’m sure. Nick Fury does not trust files.) So Fury instructs his people to build a stage, and makes sure that the right people put up some of the wrong cues.

Maybe the real Steve’s a dick, or just an above-average jock; maybe he had a knack for hanging out with real talent. Maybe he hit his head too hard on the landing and he’s not gonna be Captain anymore. On the flipside, if he really is smart, then putting him in a standard, modern hospital room and telling him the truth is going to have him clamming up and refusing to believe a goddamn thing he hears for a really long time.

The real question here is, how long it does it take for the man, the myth, the legend to notice? What does he do about it? How long does he wait to get his bearings, confirm his suspicions, and gather information before attempting busting out?

Turns out the answer’s about forty-five seconds.

grrrlillabiscuits:

he was a skater catshe said “see you later cat”meow meow meow meow meow meow meow meow

grrrlillabiscuits:

he was a skater cat
she said “see you later cat”
meow meow meow meow
meow meow meow meow

j6:

demonicdorothy:

japanese dragon:

- long
- chill
- no wings
- legs
- moustache
- in the sea

chinese dragon:

- long
- p chill
- no wings
- legs often but not always
- impressive beard
- 9 is a big deal

european dragons:

- jerks
- breathing fire
- wings
- often actually a wyvern
- compulsive hoarding
- caves

slavic dragon:

- three fucking heads bro
- can you believe it
- wings and like
- 3 whole heads

leviathan:

- honestly probably just a whale and you should all chill 

American Dragon:

- jake long

pantslesswrock:

thesoundandtheponies:

Someshing you may not know about me… My bad self DMs for an almost weekly Dungeons & Dragons group (because dork awesome). If you have never played, I highly recommend finding someone who can guide you through the learning curve and giving it the old college try.A few weeks ago, one of my players found their character (a level 8 wizard named Abadon) in a really bad spot— separated from the rest of the group and just a turn away from irreversible death at the hands of a very powerful wizard. Having already exhausted every obvious possibility for survival, he began scrambling through the notes and spells and items scrawled in every margin of his character sheets, looking for some means of saving himself. He tells me Abadon pulls out the Charming Dreamcatcher, an item that allows the user to control the actions of an opponent to a point (don’t worry, I am careful with item creation), provided that the user can keep sight of his target through the center of the dreamcatcher. He tells me that he uses it to force the enemy wizard to “Uhhm… Teleport to his mother’s house!”I’m like, “But then you won’t be able to see him anymore, and he’ll just teleport right back!”Eager to defend Abadon’s rationale, another player chimes in with, “No way, he’s a member of the prestigious Red Guard, so he probably NEVER visits home! He just appears at home and mom’s just gonna let him leave? UNLIKELY.”So I grab my dice and do a bunch of rolls to determine if mom’s even home, and of course she is, and the players are going crazy trying to convince me of how overbearing and controlling this particular guard’s mom is.They are just tickling me with all of this, so I say, “Okay okay, we’ll do opposing Diplomacy checks. I’ll roll for the Red Guard wizard, and one of you rolls for mom.” As they roll for mom, one of them says (in their best Mrs. Costanza voice), “I haven’t even met your girlfriend, for cryin’ out loud!”The above picture was the result. I rolled a paltry seven, and they totally dominated me with a 20. Abadon was able to escape death because he sent an enemy home to his mother, who then guilted him into sitting down to a home-cooked meal. “You’re always out guarding this, or killing that— never any time to visit your poor mother!”Best encounter ever.

this is fantastic

pantslesswrock:

thesoundandtheponies:

Someshing you may not know about me… My bad self DMs for an almost weekly Dungeons & Dragons group (because dork awesome). If you have never played, I highly recommend finding someone who can guide you through the learning curve and giving it the old college try.

A few weeks ago, one of my players found their character (a level 8 wizard named Abadon) in a really bad spot— separated from the rest of the group and just a turn away from irreversible death at the hands of a very powerful wizard. Having already exhausted every obvious possibility for survival, he began scrambling through the notes and spells and items scrawled in every margin of his character sheets, looking for some means of saving himself. He tells me Abadon pulls out the Charming Dreamcatcher, an item that allows the user to control the actions of an opponent to a point (don’t worry, I am careful with item creation), provided that the user can keep sight of his target through the center of the dreamcatcher. He tells me that he uses it to force the enemy wizard to “Uhhm… Teleport to his mother’s house!”

I’m like, “But then you won’t be able to see him anymore, and he’ll just teleport right back!”

Eager to defend Abadon’s rationale, another player chimes in with, “No way, he’s a member of the prestigious Red Guard, so he probably NEVER visits home! He just appears at home and mom’s just gonna let him leave? UNLIKELY.”

So I grab my dice and do a bunch of rolls to determine if mom’s even home, and of course she is, and the players are going crazy trying to convince me of how overbearing and controlling this particular guard’s mom is.

They are just tickling me with all of this, so I say, “Okay okay, we’ll do opposing Diplomacy checks. I’ll roll for the Red Guard wizard, and one of you rolls for mom.” As they roll for mom, one of them says (in their best Mrs. Costanza voice), “I haven’t even met your girlfriend, for cryin’ out loud!”

The above picture was the result. I rolled a paltry seven, and they totally dominated me with a 20. Abadon was able to escape death because he sent an enemy home to his mother, who then guilted him into sitting down to a home-cooked meal. “You’re always out guarding this, or killing that— never any time to visit your poor mother!”

Best encounter ever.

this is fantastic

grendeltalkstothedragon:

Bear-O is legitimately my favorite character.

halloweevee:

"feminist logic makes it seem like you cant make any female characters sexy without objectifiying them!"

nah there is a vast difference between this

image

and this

image

officialtokyosan:

benigoat:

Press B to crouch.

This is a sneaking mission.

officialtokyosan:

benigoat:

Press B to crouch.

This is a sneaking mission.

ronaldtherapist:

IM ACTUALLY LAUGHNG SO HARD

theclassicals:

two kinds of people

andthebluestblue:

stop saying “his or her”

use “their”

piss off prescriptivists
acknowledge nonbinary identities
make your sentences less clunky
advocate for common usage which is what leads to grammatical acceptance 

beesmygod:

what a weird piano

beesmygod:

what a weird piano